Qasimjamila

Houthi terrorist militias surrounded a small village in Al Mahwit Governorate, killing, wounding, and arresting a number of villagers in a Houthi attempt to subdue anti-Houthi tribes.

The Houthis have besieged the village of Heften, with a population of 500, launched a military campaign against it, and kidnapped seven social figures in the village. Villagers called on the Yemeni Presidential Council to open the front lines against the Houthi militias, after the militias exploited the truce and attacked Yemeni villages

--

--

An aviation security contract to managed Afghanistan Airports is crucial for the Taliban regime which wants to show they can create jobs for Afghanistan citizens. According to various sources, Kabul airport would provide a main source of intelligence on movements in and out of the country.

Recently, several articles circulated online claiming that the firm manages the Afghan airport is in cooperation with an Israeli company.

Those who spread the rumour that Israel is running the airport are media tools affiliated with countries that spread hatred.

--

--

Lebanon plans to build two new grain silos to fight its its worsening food security crisis, the country’s caretaker economy minister told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

Amin Salam said that several countries and international organizations have expressed an interest in funding and bidding for the new silos, which will cost a total of $100 million.

Lebanon’s only grain silos in the Beirut Port are in ruins, after hundreds of tons of explosive ammonium nitrate in detonated there almost two years ago. The blast killed over 200 people and wounded over 6,000 others.

--

--

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) arrived in Greece Tuesday and is due to head to France later in the week, his first European Union trip since the 2018 killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The trip comes less than two weeks after US President Joe Biden visited the Saudi city of Jeddah for a summit of Arab leaders and met one-on-one with the crown prince, greeting him with a fist bump.

That move sealed Biden’s retreat from a presidential election campaign pledge to turn the kingdom into a “pariah” over the Khashoggi affair and wider human rights controversies.

--

--

After three years of repeated attempts to get her digital national identity card, Rubina — a woman from the Pakistani city of Karachi — decided to take her battle to court, winning a landmark victory.

Until then, Pakistanis had not been able to get the Computerized National Identity Card (CNIC) unless they presented their father’s ID card — an impossibility for many people, including those like Rubina who were raised by single mothers.

The card is vital to vote, access government benefits including public schools and health care, open a bank account or apply for jobs.

The agency in charge of the CNIC, the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA), has said it is striving to reach people who have so far been excluded.

--

--

A controversial Saudi painter is aiming to overturn traditional public perceptions of art with her modern abstract style.

Jana Mousa has been the subject of criticism for portraying nudity and womanly shapes in her vibrant artwork.

It was during the coronavirus pandemic lockdown when Mousa rediscovered her love of painting and with the help of her family, she set up a social media account and started posting her work online

--

--

Lebanese children are at risk as water supply systems across the country teeter on the brink of failure, UNICEF has warned.

The UN body said Lebanon’s limited power supplies make it impossible to pump enough water, and in some cases, “cause pumping operations to shut down entirely.”

The UNICEF warning came amid political chaos in Lebanon that is causing further crises, leading to caretaker Prime Minister Najib Mikati calling the country “Al-Asfouriyeh” (the lunatic asylum) in a speech on Wednesday.

--

--

He was responding to a comment published on social media by the former EU Commissioner for Education Androula Vassiliou, where she said Cyprus has ranked at the bottom of the list in the latest Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) survey.

Prodromou rubbished this, saying that it was true some years ago, but not currently. “In recent years, the sample and the proof that the educational reform is paying off is that the results of our students in international surveys have improved greatly.”

The minister said that the last international survey for which the ministry has results is the 2019 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).

--

--

Qasimjamila

Qasimjamila

Columnist Freelance Journalist, News, Story Writer, stories from the Middle East’s